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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas found in the catalog.

Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas

Henry Sheldon Fitch

Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas

by Henry Sheldon Fitch

  • 248 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by University of Kansas in Lawrence .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Amphibians -- Kansas,
  • Reptiles -- Kansas,
  • Temperature -- Physiological effect

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 474-475

    SeriesUniversity of Kansas publications. Museum of Natural History, v. 8, no. 7
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[417]-475 p.
    Number of Pages475
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14626702M

    Bishop, S.C. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Allegheny State Park. New York State Museum, Handbook 3, Albany, New York. Bishop, S.C. Notes on some amphibians and reptiles from the southeastern states, with a description of a new salamander from North Carolina. Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society – A population study of the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) in northeastern Kansas. By Edwin P. Martin. Pp. , 19 figures in text. April 2, 7. Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas. By Henry S. Fitch. Pp. , 10 figures in text, 6 tables. June 1, 8.

    The trend of these records indicated the temperature range within which the snakes normally limit their activity, and the preferred temperature. In an earlier publication (Fitch, ) based on a few more than half the number of records of temperature now available, I discussed responses of the blue racer to temperature. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles: Imprinted binder, taxonomic tabs, and accounts $ Reproductive Biology and Diseases of Captive Reptiles. James B. Murphy and Joseph T. Collins (eds.) , p. ilust. (paperbound) $ Contribution to the Herpetology of Arabia. J. Anderson, , p. illus. (one plate in color).

    None of the other reptiles and amphibians observed in the Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas. Univ. Kansas Pub. Mus. Natur. Hist., Home ranges, territories, and seasonal movements of verte-. has been observed on 32 mammals (including humans), 52 birds, 39 reptiles and 3 amphibians (Benton ). The juveniles and adults are free-living in the soil and eat small arthropods and their eggs in the leaf litter (Figure ). Duration of the life stages for E. alfreddugesi is shown in Table In.


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Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas by Henry Sheldon Fitch Download PDF EPUB FB2

Temperature Responses in Free Living Amphibians and Reptiles of Northeastern Kansas [Fitch, Henry Sheldon, Hall, E. Raymond, Leonard, A.

Byron] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Temperature Responses in Free Living Amphibians and Reptiles of Northeastern KansasCited by: 8. Get this from a library. Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas.

[Henry S Fitch]. Free-living definition, following a way of life in which one freely indulges the appetites, desires, etc.

See more. Fitch, H.S. Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas. University of Kansas Publications, Museum of Natural History 8(7) Fitch, H. Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas.

University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publications 8: Cited by:   Fitch, Henry S. Temperature responses in free-living amphibans and reptiles of Northeastern Kansas. University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History 8(7) Loomis, Richard B.

The chigger mites of Kansas (Acarina, Trombiculidae). University of Kansas Science Bulletin 37() Clarke, Robert F. Temperature Responses In Free Living Amphibians And Reptiles Of Northeastern Kansas Henry Sheldon Fitch, E.

Raymond Hall (Editor), A. Byron Leonard (Editor) Editore: Literary Licensing, LLC. Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas. By Henry S, Fitch. 10 figures in text, 6 tables. June 1, Temperature responses in free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas.

Univ. Kansas Publ. Museum Nat. Hist. 8, – W. G.: The effect of acclimation on physiological responses to temperature in the snakes, Thamnophis proximus and Natrix rhombifera.

Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 35, – CrossRef Google Scholar. An ecological study of reptiles and amphibians in Osage County, Kansas. Emporia State Research Studies Temperature responces in free-living amphibians and reptiles of Northeastern.

In amphibians, changes in body hydration and body temperature tend to have synergistic effects on physiological performance Pough; Walvoord ), and frogs will often maintain body.

Full text of "University of Kansas publications, Museum of Natural History" See other formats. Fitch, H.S. Temperature responses of free-living amphibians and reptiles of northeastern Kansas.

Bulletin of the Museum of Natural History University of Kansas – Fitch, H.S. Home ranges, territories, and seasonal movements of vertebrates of the Natural History Reservation. Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Henry Sheldon Fitch books online.

Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Temperature responses of free-living amphib­ ians and reptiles in northeastern Kansas. Univ. Kansas Publ. Mus. Natur. Hist. 8(7) Home ranges and seasonal movements of vertebrates of the Natural History Reservation.

Ibid. 11(3) The University of Kansas Natural History Reserva­ tion in Univ. Kansas Mus. [] Fitch, Henry S. Temperature Responses in Free-Living Amphibians and Reptiles of Northeastern Kansas.

Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas, First Edition. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Wrappers. Fine University of Kansas Publications, Museum of Natural History, Vol 8, No. 7, pp.10 figs., 6 tables. No stamps or other marks. THE BRADY SOIL AND SUBDIVISION OF POST-SANGAMONIAN TIME IN THE MIDCONTINENT REGION by Frye, John C.

and A. Byron Leonard. American Journal. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Section Editors Book Reviews Editor ROBERT W. HANSEN Deer Path Lane Clovis, California USA e-mail: [email protected] AARON M. BAUER Villanova University, USA e-mail: [email protected] Current Research Associate Editors MICHAEL F.

BENARD JOSHUA M. HALE Case Western Reserve. Extant amphibians retain a larval stage in their life history (Fig. Thus, in most cases, the eggs give rise to a free-living "tadpole" stage that somewhat later metamorphoses to produce the definitive adult.

In some species, the free-living larval stage is reduced or almost eliminated from the life cycle, but such instances are rare. Fitch, H.S. Reproduction in snakes of the Fitch Natural History Reservation in northeastern Kansas.

Journal of Kansas Herpetology Fitch, H.S. The effect of female size on number of eggs or young snakes.

Journal of Kansas Herpetology Fitch, H.S. Observations on wandering of juvenile snakes in northeastern Kansas. Amphibians and Reptiles J. Alan Pounds Reproductive Biology Responses to Seasonality Population Biology Community Ecology Comparative Ecology countries, Canada and the U.S., and in them live nearly species of amphibians.

NORTH AMERICAN AMPHIBIANS Amphibians are far from being the largest of North America’s wildlife. Most are small. Many are tiny. The Little Grass Frog is no more than cm end to end and the Two-toed.

The basic body plan of mites is shown in Fig. The body is divided into two major regions, the anterior gnathosoma, bearing the pedipalps and chelicerae, and the idiosoma, the remainder of the body bearing the legs and eyes (when present).The pedipalps are typically five-segmented but may be greatly reduced and highly modified in different groups of mites.